The Kosenkov Group

Physical Chemistry at Monmouth University

Courses

  1. General Chemistry I and II (CE 111, 112)
  2. Physical Chemistry I (CE 341)
  3. Physical Chemistry I Laboratory (CE 341L)
  4. Physical Chemistry II (CE 342)
  5. Physical Chemistry II Laboratory (CE 342L)
  6. Computational Chemistry and Molecular Modeling (CE 475)

General Chemistry I and II (CE 111, 112)

The courses provide a preparation for subsequent courses in chemistry. Principles and theories of chemistry problem solving,stoichiometry, states of matter, atomic and molecular structure, introductory quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, kinetics, electrochemistry, chemistry of metals and nonmetals, and nuclear chemistry. Go to top

Physical Chemistry I (CE 341)

Basic principles of quantum mechanics essential for understanding of atomic and molecular spectroscopy are covered. The specific topics included: Quantum mechanics: postulates and formulation of Schrödinger equation, uncertainty principle, particle in a box, simple harmonic oscillator, rigid rotor, Hydrogen atom, hydrogenic wave functions, Pauli principle, Helium atom, Hydrogen molecule, Molecular Orbital Theory; Introduction and applications of Computational Chemistry; Spectroscopy: Light-matter interaction, term symbols, spectroscopic selection rules, electronic spectra of atoms and molecules,rotational and vibrational spectra, IR and Raman spectroscopy, Lasers. Go to top

Physical Chemistry I Laboratory (CE 341L)

This course is designed to be taken concurrently with CE 341, Physical Chemistry I. The experiments performed complement material studied in CE 341. Topics covered include: UV-Vis, FT-IR, Raman, Laser Induced Fluorescence, and Flash Photolysis spectroscopies. This laboratory also requires the use of modern computer platforms and quantum chemistry software for molecular simulations and data analysis. Go to top

Physical Chemistry II (CE 342)

Amplification of concepts in thermodynamics, chemical kinetics and dynamics and application of these to gases, liquids, and solutions to provide a solid background for understanding the physical principles that govern behavior of chemical and biological systems. The specific topics included: Thermodynamics: standard functions (enthalpy, entropy, etc.), ensembles, partition function. Gibbs chemical potential, phase equilibria, electrochemical cells; Kinetic Theory of Gases: Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, collision frequency; effusion rate, heat capacity, transport processes (diffusion, viscosity, etc.); Chemical Kinetics: differential and integral expressions for rate laws, reaction mechanisms, Chemical Dynamics: collision theory; absolute rate theory, transition state theory. Go to top

Physical Chemistry II Laboratory (CE 342L)

This course is designed to be taken concurrently with CE 342, Physical Chemistry II. The experiments performed complement material studied in CE 342. Topics covered include experimental investigation of gas laws, phase transitions, transport properties of gases (diffusion), electrochemistry (electrolysis, electroplating, and voltammetry) and chemical kinetics (fluorescence quenching). This laboratory also requires the use of modern computer platforms and quantum chemistry software for simulations of chemical kinetics, dynamics and data analysis. Go to top

Computational Chemistry and Molecular Modeling (CE 475)

The course covers modern computational methods and techniques used to study structure and chemical reactivity of organic and biological molecules. First principles (ab initio), force field methods which are used in molecular dynamics simulations and computer aided drug design are presented. The course aimed to assist students in providing theoretical background and developing competence in application of computational chemistry tools. Go to top